Reports and Academic Papers

Filter by category
Type of publication

Open access to harmonised digital data describing Earth’s surface and subsurface holds immense value for society. This paper highlights the significance of open access to digital geoscience data ranging from the shallow topsoil or seabed to depths of 5 km. Such data play a pivotal role in facilitating endeavours such as renewable geoenergy solutions, resilient urban planning, supply of critical raw materials, assessment and protection of water resources, mitigation of floods and droughts, identification of suitable locations for carbon capture and storage, development of offshore wind farms, disaster risk reduction, and conservation of ecosystems and biodiversity. EuroGeoSurveys, the Geological Surveys of Europe, have worked diligently for over a decade to ensure open access to harmonised digital European geoscience data and knowledge through the European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI). EGDI acts as a data and information resource for providing wide-ranging geoscience data and research, as this paper demonstrates through selected research data and information on four vital natural resources: geoenergy, critical raw materials, water, and soils. Importantly, it incorporates near real-time remote and in-situ monitoring data, thus constituting an invaluable up-to-date database that facilitates informed decision-making, policy implementation, sustainable resource management, the green transition, achieving UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the envisioned future of digital twins in Earth sciences. EGDI and its thematic map viewer are tailored, continuously enhanced, and developed in collaboration with all relevant researchers and stakeholders. Its primary objective is to address societal needs by providing data for sustainable, secure, and integrated management of surface and subsurface resources, effectively establishing a geological service for Europe. We argue that open access to surface and subsurface geoscience data is crucial for an efficient green transition to a net-zero society, enabling integrated and coherent surface and subsurface spatial planning.

Read More

Academic Papers and BooksCites EGSUses data derived from EGS research

A steady supply of mineral raw materials is vital for the transition to a low-carbon, circular economy. The number of active mines in Europe has severely declined over the last century and half, giving rise to many abandoned mining waste sites and corresponding geological heritage. Also, the rise in minerals demand for large-scale deployment of renewable energy requires the continued and steady availability of key minerals. The supply risk associated with unpredicted geopolitical events needs to be eliminated/ mitigated. Historical mine waste sites are the answer but evaluating mine waste is a lengthy and costly exercise. The study, undertaken in the Lousal Mine, used small unmanned aerial systems (sUASs) to model and determine mine waste volumes by generating orthomosaic maps with quick, inexpensive, and reliable results.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

The Geological Surveys of Europe move steadily toward their ambition to bridge diverse areas where geoscience can support energy transition policy: water, energy, minerals, urban and marine infrastructure, and more. This ambition is built on the European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI), which brings together harmonised pan-European subsurface data supported by expert networks. Such efforts tackle the problem that current digital twins of the Earth largely ignore important subsurface resources and processes. We demonstrate how subsurface data supports implementation of Green Deal policy through case studies at national, municipal, and EU level. These cases also allow looking from the past toward the future and underline the importance of dedicated community efforts to build EGDI and a Geological Service for Europe.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

EGS provides public earth science knowledge to support the EU’s competitiveness, social well-being, environmental management and international commitments. 2023 Bi-Annual Report for the year 2021 and 2022.

Read More

EGS Annual Reports

EGS provides public earth science knowledge to support the EU’s competitiveness, social well-being, environmental management and international commitments. 2019 Bi-Annual Report for the year 2019 and 2020.

Read More

EGS Annual Reports

EGS provides public earth science knowledge to support the EU’s competitiveness, social well-being, environmental management and international commitments. 2019 Bi-Annual Report for the year 2017 and 2018.

Read More

EGS Annual Reports

EGS provides public earth science knowledge to support the EU’s competitiveness, social well-being, environmental management and international commitments. 2017 Annual Report.

Read More

EGS Annual Reports

Landslide monitoring is a mandatory step in landslide risk assessment. It requires collecting data on landslide conditions (e.g., areal extent, landslide kinematics, surface topography, hydrogeometeorological parameters, and failure surfaces) from different time periods and at different scales, from site-specific to local, regional, and national, to assess landslide activity. In this analysis, we collected information on landslide monitoring techniques from 17 members of the Earth Observation and Geohazards Expert Group (from EuroGeoSurveys) deployed between 2005 and 2021.

Read More

Academic Papers and BooksCites EGS

Geochemical investigation of topsoil from a mixed industrial and residential area in the southern part of the city of Sisak was carried out in order to determine the concentration, spatial distribution, metal-bearing phases and sources of Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, W and Zn by applying inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS).

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

29 inorganic compounds (Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Gd, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn) were measured in the tap water of 484 representative homes of children aged 6 months to 6 years in metropolitan France in 2008–2009. Parents were asked whether their children consumed tap water. Sampling design and sampling weights were taken into account to estimate element concentrations in tap water supplied to the 3,581,991 homes of 4,923,058 children aged 6 months to 6 years.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

In the context of the European Union’s Soil Thematic Strategy, policy makers require easy access to soil data and information of various types and scales to assess the state of soils at European level. To satisfy this need, the European Commission and the European Environment Agency (EEA) decided to establish the European Soil Data Centre (ESDAC), located at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

There has been considerable interest in geodiversity and pedodiversity studies over the last approximately 30 years. Pedodiversity is considered part of geodiversity, but in practice they involved different experts and traditions. There are many common aspects that could be shared by all natural diversity studies, however, these common aspects have not been adequately studied and debated.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

(No Abstract Available)

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

In 2014, the list of Critical Raw Materials for the European Union included for the first time an energy fossil resource: coking coal. Its presence was due to its high economic importance, being the second raw material in the list immediately after tungsten, although with a low supply risk as Australia and USA were the main exporters of coking coal to the European Union in recent years. However, on the 2017 list, coking coal is considered a borderline case. Although it narrowly misses the economic importance threshold, for the sake of caution, coking coal is kept on the list and thus included in the table. However, it will be phased out from the next list should it fail to meet the criteria in full.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

Geochemical atlas of Croatia resulted from the regional geochemical survey based on the low-density (1 sample per 25 km2) soil sampling having covered the entire territory of the state. Basically, the collection of maps showing distribution of a set of elements with particular emphasis of possibly harmful elements (PHE) was focused on elucidation of environmental implications brought about by human impact (ingress of Pb, Zn, Cd and other elements derived from anthropogenic sources) against some zero-level represented by geochemical background.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

Beira city and Dondo district in Mozambique were studied with the purpose of evaluating the environmental quality of soil and to relate its quality with land cover and geology. This study revealed, by means of statistical tools, such as principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling, geochemical signatures of geogenic and anthropogenic origin in top- and sub-soil samples. Elements present in detrital minerals, deposited in recent geological formations of sedimentary origin (Ba, Cr, Hf, Ti, Th, U and REE), are related to the erosion products of mafic and orthogneissic formations derived from the upstream reaches of Pungwe River.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

Modelling of topsoil geochemical data using discriminant function analysis, along with a set of corresponding geochemical maps, portray a legacy of environmental contamination in the city of Sisak. Based on centred log-ratio (clr) transformed compositional data from topsoil samples collected on Kupa-Odra and Sava River floodplain sediments and loess, underlying the Sisak urban area, and regrouped according to their land use characteristics (urban, industrial and agricultural areas), a few element clusters emerged accounting for discrimination between the defined groups.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

Extreme geological events, such as earthquakes, are a significant global concern and sometimes their consequences can be devastating. Geographic information plays a critical role in health protection regarding hazards, and there are a range of initiatives using geographic information to communicate risk as well as to support early warning systems operated by geologists. Nevertheless we consider there to remain shortfalls in translating information on extreme geological events into health protection tools, and suggest that social scientists have an important role to play in aiding the development of a new generation of toolkits aimed at public health practitioners.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

Soil plays a central role in food safety as it determines the possible composition of food and feed at the root of the food chain. However, the quality of soil resources as defined by their potential impact on human health by propagation of harmful elements through the food chain has been poorly studied in Europe due to the lack of data of adequate detail and reliability. The European Union’s first harmonized topsoil sampling and coherent analytical procedure produced trace element measurements from approximately 22,000 locations.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books

Within the framework of the Pan-European project about the geochemistry of bottled mineral waters in Europe launched in 2007 by the European Geological Surveys (EGS) Geochemistry Expert Group fourteen brands of bottled natural waters from Croatia of both mineral and spring types were evaluated for getting more coherent spatial information about the natural variation of element concentration in bottled waters found at the European market. Results of chemical analysis show that not a single one out of fourteen analyzed bottled waters from Croatia exceeds the Croatian water standards sanctioning thereby their suitability for human consumption.

Read More

Cites EGSAcademic Papers and Books